University of Southern California
University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
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About Us
About Us

Meet Our Trojan Family

Alexandra Zuck MA II ‘18

Alexandra Zuck MA II ‘18

Entry-Level Master's program

Hometown: Sandusky, Ohio

What brought you to occupational therapy?
I’ve always wanted to understand and help others. During my undergraduate program at University of Florida, I was working in a skilled nursing facility where I first discovered OT. The therapists and their patients were so engaged and happy; after learning more, I felt that I had stumbled upon the perfect career. When my dad was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2014, I watched him go through therapy in smiles and good spirit. The rehabilitation team at the acute inpatient care unit were so positive and encouraging. Before he passed away, he was able to have happy experiences as a human, not just a patient. This further confirmed that this was the right profession. The field’s holistic and dynamic approach to rehabilitation makes it truly client-centered and effective. I only hope that I can be as great of an OT as those that I have met so far.

What area of practice are you interested in?
Outpatient adult rehab, specifically outpatient neurology.

Describe your background before coming to occupational therapy:
Before discovering Occupational Therapy, I was getting my undergraduate degree in psychology.  I had worked on a crisis hotline and within hospital administration, so I had thought that I wanted to do something along those lines. As long as I was helping others, I knew that I would be happy. After graduation, I volunteered within hospice as a grief counselor and prepared to apply to programs.

What are some of the occupations you engage in?
I love traveling, spending time with my family and friends, volunteering, going to concerts, trying new restaurants and breweries, and being on the water.

If you could choose anyone (living or dead) to be your mentor, who would you pick?
My grandparents. I was lucky enough to grow up very close to my grandparents on both sides of my family. They’ve taught me so much about life and the importance of family. I know that I wouldn’t be as strong of a person without them.

How do you want to be remembered?
I want to be remembered as an advocate for people and communities who don’t have the support to live a just quality of life. More importantly, I want to be remembered not just as an individual, but as a part of a larger movement to improve the quality of life for all people, regardless of background and circumstances.