University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Redesigning Lives Globally
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Faculty

Faculty

Julie McLaughlin Gray PhD, OTR/L

Julie Gray

Director of the Professional Program and Associate Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

Room: CHP 133
Phone: (323) 442-2877
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Biography

Julie McLaughlin Gray, an occupational therapist for over 30 years, has extensive clinical experience in stroke and brain injury rehabilitation. She received her BS degree in Occupational Therapy from San Jose State University. She later received a master's degree in occupational therapy and a PhD in occupational science from the University of Southern California. Her doctoral research in occupational science examined the personal experience and complex process of recovery from stroke, and their relationship to occupation. Her publications within occupational therapy and occupational science literature address dynamic systems and occupation, a definition of occupation, occupation-centered practice and the relevance of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to occupational therapy and occupational science. Dr. McLaughlin Gray has also done extensive training and teaching in the Neurodevelopmental Treatment Approach for adults with hemiplegia, and has presented on interdisciplinary professional education and evidence-based practice in rehabilitation.

Research Interests

Dr. McLaughlin Gray is interested in stroke and brain injury rehabilitation and recovery, particularly concerning the survivor's experience and the emotional consequences of stroke, as well as the multiple ways in which occupation can be used to promote recovery.

Education

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Occupational Science
University of Southern California
2006

Master of Arts (MA) in Occupational Therapy
University of Southern California
1995

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Occupational Therapy
San Jose State University
1984

Publications

Book Chapters

Schultz-Krohn, W., Pope-Davis, S. A., Jourdan, J. M., & Gray, J. M. (2013). Traditional sensorimotor approaches to intervention. In H. M. Pendleton & W. Schultz-Krohn (Eds.), Pedretti's occupational therapy: Practice skills for physical dysfunction (7th ed.). (pp. 796-830). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier. Link to full text

Flinn, N. A., Jackson, J. M., Gray, J. M., & Zemke, R. (2008). Optimizing abilities and capacities: Range of motion, strength, and endurance. In M. V. Radomski & C. A. T. Latham (Eds.), Occupational therapy for physical dysfunction (6th ed.). (pp. 573-597). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Link to full text

Gray, J. M. (2001). Optimizing abilities and capacities: Range of motion, strength, and endurance. In C. A. Trombly & M. V. Radomski (Eds.), Occupational therapy for physical dysfunction (5th ed.). (pp. 463-480). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Gray, J. M., Kennedy, B. L., & Zemke, R. (1996). Application of dynamic systems theory to occupation. In R. Zemke & F. Clark (Eds.), Occupational science: The evolving discipline. (pp. 297-324). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis.

Journal Articles

Gonyea, J. S., & Gray, J. M. (2012). Making the transition to career in occupational therapy: Student perspectives. The Advisor: Journal of the National Association of Advisors for the Health Professions, 32(4), 20-23. Link to full text

Gray, J. M. (2001). Discussion of the ICIDH-2 in relation to occupational therapy and occupational science. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 8, 19-30. doi:10.1080/110381201300078465. Link to full text

Gray, J. M. (1998). Putting occupation into practice: Occupation as ends, occupation as means. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 52, 354-364. doi:10.5014/ajot.52.5.354. Link to full text Abstract →← Abstract 

This article addresses a difficulty that many occupational therapists experience: maintaining occupation as the core of their therapeutic intervention. This difficulty not only results from but also contributes to occupational therapy's struggle with professional identity. Current manifestations of the problem are described as component-driven practice and the narrowing of occupation to basic activities of daily Living. The concepts of occupation as ends and occupation as means are proposed as a practical solution to guide treatment planning and merge remediation and adaptation within a single occupational session. Each concept is investigated in terms of its history within the profession and its usefulness for analyzing and solving therapeutic problems. These concepts are discussed as useful guidelines to help occupational therapists not only in their clinical decision making but also in their understanding and expression of the field's unique expertise. A case example, applying occupation as ends and occupation as means to evaluation and treatment, is presented.

Gray, J. M. (1997). Application of the phenomenological method to the concept of occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 4, 5-17. doi:10.1080/14427591.1997.9686416. Link to full text Abstract →← Abstract 

Phenomenology began as a movement in philosophy that deals with the essences of objects, or phenomena as they present themselves in human consciousness. The founding father of phenomenology, Husserl, believed that through rigorous examination of objects, as they are presented in one’s consciousness, a person could come to intuitively know the essence of those objectivities, or realities. He proposed that other disciplines might benefit from phenomenology as a way of identifying the main objectivities with which the discipline deals, before undertaking other inquiry. The phenomenological method outlines the steps of such an investigation. This paper uses the steps of the phenomenological method to explore the essence of occupation.