University of Southern California
University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
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Faculty
Faculty

Larry Yin MD, MSPH

Larry Yin MD, MSPH

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, joint appointment with the USC Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy and Clinical Services Director and Medical Director, Boone Fetter Autism Clinic and the CA-LEND Rett Clinic at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles

(323) 669-2110
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Web: www.chla.org/profile/larry-yin-md

Publications

Journal Articles

Espinoza, J., Chen, A., Orozco, J., Deavenport-Saman, A., & Yin, L. (2017). Effect of personal activity trackers on weight loss in families enrolled in a comprehensive behavioral family-lifestyle intervention program in the federally qualified health center setting: A randomized controlled trial. Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 7, 86-94. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conctc.2017.06.004 Show abstractHide abstract

Background. Childhood obesity continues to be a substantial problem despite major public health efforts, and disproportionately impacts children from low-income families. Digital health tools and consumer technology offer promising opportunities for interventions, but few studies have evaluated how they might be incorporated into existing interventions or used to create new types of interventions. It remains unclear which approaches would be most beneficial for underserved pediatric populations.
 
Purpose. To describe the design and rationale of a single-center randomized, controlled trial evaluating the effects of personal activity tracker (PAT) use by parents on weight-status improvement in both parents and overweight children enrolled in BodyWorks (BW), a comprehensive behavioral family-lifestyle intervention program (CBFLI), in a primary-care clinic serving a predominantly low-income Latino population.
 
Methods. This study is being conducted in the AltaMed general pediatrics clinic at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. Eligible participants are families (child and adult caregiver) in which the child is between 7 and 18 years of age, has a BMI ≥85th percentile for age and sex, and has been referred to BW by their AltaMed pediatrician. BW consists of one weekly, two-hour session for 7 weeks. In a given cycle, the program is offered on two separate nights: Monday (Spanish) and Wednesday (English). Families self sort into one of two groups based on language preference. To ensure balanced allocation of language preference groups and prevent in-group cross contamination, block randomization is used to assign whole groups to either the intervention or control arms of the study. The control arm consists of usual care, while the intervention arm adds assigning a Fitbit PAT to the parents and training them in its proper use. Study personnel are blinded to group assignment during the analysis phase. Study outcomes include attendance rate, program completion rate, and changes in weight-status improvement, defined as change in weight and BMI for adults and change in BMI z-score for children. We hypothesize that the intervention arm will have better weight-related outcomes than the control arm. Study completion is anticipated in 2017, after the enrollment of approximately 150 families.
 
Conclusions. The study aim is to evaluate the effects of PATs on weight-related outcomes in overweight children and parents participating in a CBFLI. The results will be important for determining whether wearable devices are an effective addition to weight loss interventions for overweight and obese children.

Solomon, O., Heritage, J., Yin, L., Maynard, D. W., & Bauman, M. L. (2016). 'What brings him here today?': Medical problem presentation involving children with autism spectrum disorders and typically developing children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(2), 378-393. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2550-2 Show abstractHide abstract

Conversation and discourse analyses were used to examine medical problem presentation in pediatric care.Healthcare visits involving children with ASD and typically developing children were analyzed. We examined how children's communicative and epistemic capabilities, and their opportunities to be socialized into a competent patient role are interactionally achieved. We found that medical problem presentation is designed to contain a 'pre-visit' account of the interactional and epistemic work that children and caregivers carry out at home to identify the child's health problems; and that the intersubjective accessibility of children's experiences that becomes disrupted by ASD presents a dilemma to all participants in the visit. The article examines interactional roots of unmet healthcare needs and foregone medical care of people with ASD.

Solomon, O., Angell, A. M., Yin, L., & Lawlor, M. C. (2015). 'You can turn off the light if you'd like': Pediatric health care visits for children with autism spectrum disorder as an interactional achievement. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 29(4), 531-555. https://doi.org/10.1111/maq.12237 Show abstractHide abstract

Substantial scholarship has been generated in medical anthropology and other social science fields on typically developing child-parent-doctor interactions during health care visits. This article contributes an ethnographic, longitudinal, discourse analytic account of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-parent-doctor interactions that occur during pediatric and neurology visits. The analysis shows that when a child with ASD walks into the doctor's office, the tacit expectations about the visit may have to be renegotiated to facilitate the child's, the parent's, and the doctor's participation in the interaction. A successful visit then becomes a hard-won achievement that requires the interactional and relational work of all three participants. We demonstrate that communicative and sensory limitations imposed by ASD present unique challenges to all the participants and consider how health care disparities may invade the pediatric encounter, making visible the structural and interactional processes that engender them.