University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Redesigning Lives Globally
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Faculty

Faculty

Katie Jordan OTD, OTR/L

Mary Jordan

Associate Chair of Occupational Therapy Clinical Services and Associate Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy

Room: CHP 133
Phone: (323) 442-2031
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Biography

Katie Jordan received dual bachelor's degrees in Fine Arts and in Psychology and Social Behavior from the University of California, Irvine. She worked as a pilates and dance instructor for several years while pursing her Occupational Therapy Doctorate degree at the University of Southern California. After obtaining her OTD, Dr. Jordan became the Director of the USC Occupational Therapy Faculty Practice. She utilized her skills as a Lifestyle Redesign® specialist with clients in the Weight Management program and in Executive Health. She was also on the faculty team that designed and implemented the LifeAdvisor training program for the Four Season’s Westlake Resort Hotel, and has taught the Lifestyle Redesign® Pathway course in the Division's professional program. In 2008, Dr. Jordan left USC to relocate to Austin, Texas, where she was the lead therapist at a Long-Term Acute Care Hospital. Upon her return to USC in 2009, she became the Associate Chair of OT Clinical Service in the Division, and the Director of OT and Speech Therapy services at Keck Hospital of USC and USC Norris Cancer Hospital. Drawing upon her leadership experience in acute rehabilitation and Lifestyle Redesign®, Dr. Jordan is working diligently to integrate, support and expand all clinical occupational therapy services across USC's campuses and community clinics.

Education

Doctorate of Occupational Therapy (OTD)
University of Southern California
2004

Master of Arts (MA) in Occupational Therapy
University of Southern California
2003

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Fine Arts
University of California, Irvine
1999

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Psychology and Social Behavior
University of California, Irvine
1999

Publications

Journal Articles

Koritzky, G., Dieterle, C., Rice, C., Jordan, K., & Bechara, A. (2014). Decision-making, sensitivity to reward and attrition in weight management. Obesity, 22, 1904-1909. doi:10.1002/oby.20770. Link to full text Abstract →← Abstract 

OBJECTIVE: Attrition is a common problem in weight management. Understanding the risk factors for attrition should enhance professionals' ability to increase completion rates and improve health outcomes for more individuals. A model that draws upon neuropsychological knowledge on reward-sensitivity in obesity and overeating to predict attrition is proposed.
 
METHODS: A total of 52 participants in a weight-management program completed a complex decision-making task. Decision-making characteristics-including sensitivity to reward-were further estimated using a quantitative model. Impulsivity and risk-taking measures were also administered.
 
RESULTS: Consistent with the hypothesis that sensitivity to reward predicted attrition, program dropouts had higher sensitivity to reward than completers (P < 0.03). No differences were observed between completers and dropouts in initial BMI, age, employment status, or the number of prior weight-loss attempts (P ≥ 0.07). Completers had a slightly higher education level than dropouts, but its inclusion in the model did not increase predictive power. Impulsivity, delay of gratification, and risk taking did not predict attrition, either.
 
CONCLUSIONS: Findings link attrition in weight management to the neural mechanisms associated with reward-seeking and related influences on decision-making. Individual differences in the magnitude of response elicited by rewards may account for the relative difficulty experienced by dieters in adhering to treatment.

Reingold, F. S., & Jordan, K. (2013). Obesity and occupational therapy [Position paper]. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, S39-S46. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.67S39. Link to full text Abstract →← Abstract 

Obesity is a significant and wide-ranging health and social problem in the United States. Occupational therapy is a health care profession that is qualified to provide interventions with individuals, groups, and society to effect change to promote optimum health. Occupational therapy services often are used directly and indirectly to influence weight management and related health concerns through attention to healthy lifestyle choices and engagement in fulfilling occupations. The purpose of this paper is to explain the position of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) to persons within and outside the profession on the role of occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants in addressing the impact of obesity on people's ability to engage in daily activities.

Clark, F., Reingold, F. S., & Salles-Jordan, K. (2007). Obesity and occupational therapy [Position paper]. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61, 701-703. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.6.701. Link to full text Abstract →← Abstract 

Obesity is a significant and wide-ranging health and social problem in the United States. Occupational therapy is a health care profession that is qualified to provide interventions with individuals, groups, and society to effect change to promote optimum health. Occupational therapy services are often used directly and indirectly to influence weight management and related health concerns through attention to lifestyle and engagement in fulfilling activities. The purpose of this paper is to explain to persons within and outside of the profession the role of occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants in addressing the impact of obesity on people's ability to engage in daily activities.