University of Southern California
University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
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How virtual avatars help stroke patients improve motor function

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By Sophia Stuart/PC Mag


Sook-Lei Liew, right, puts her REINVENT virtual reality rig through the paces | Photo by Nate Jensen

Sook-Lei Liew, right, puts her REINVENT virtual reality rig through the paces | Photo by Nate Jensen

I am hooked up to a 16-channel brain machine interface with 12 channels of EEG on my head and ears and four channels of electromyography (EMG) on my arms. An Oculus Rift occludes my vision.

Two inertial measurement units (IMU) are stuck to my wrists and forearms, tracking the orientation of my arms, while the EMG monitors my electrical impulses and peripheral nerve activity.

Dr. Sook-Lei Liew, Director of USC’s Neural Plasticity and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory, and Julia Anglin, Research Lab Supervisor and Technician, wait to record my baseline activity and observe a monitor with a representation of my real arm and a virtual limb. I see the same image from inside the Rift.

“Ready?” asks Dr. Liew. “Don’t move—or think.”

Read the full article at PC Mag.