University of Southern California
University of Southern California
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
Mrs. T.H. Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy
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Research
Research

Current PhD Students

Cristin Holland

Faculty Mentor: Barbara Thompson PhD

Research Lab: Social and Emotional Neurodevelopment Lab

Year of Entry: 2016

Cristin Holland

Education

MOT in Occupational Therapy
Worcester State University

BA in Psychology
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Research Interests

My research pursuits within the Social and Emotional Neurodevelopment Lab center on the intersection of neurodevelopment and social-emotional behavior, particularly within dyadic interactions. These dyadic interactions encompass mother-infant and adult-child laboratory interactions, in addition to therapist-child interactions. Dyadic interactions are important arenas for social-emotional learning and skill acquisition. I am interested in how developmental, neurological, and physiological factors impact social engagement in typically developing children and children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Additionally, I am interested in the development of social engagement across early childhood and the lasting impact of disrupting the developmental trajectory. I use a combination of standardized assessments and detailed behavior coding to investigate social-emotional phenomena occurring across a variety of dyadic interactions. Currently, I am exploring differences in social engagement during play in typically developing children and those with Autism Spectrum Disorders to better understand social and emotional behavior. Another avenue of my research focuses on integrating occupational therapists’ and children’s behaviors during sensory integration intervention sessions to better understand the complexities of intervention success and investigate the impacts of the therapeutic relationship during this intervention. My research on dyadic interactions aims to further elicit mechanisms of engagement that influence social and emotional development.